Thursday, February 11, 2016

Library 2.016: Privacy in the Digital Age (March 16th, Online)

The Learning Revolution and School of Information at San José State University are excited to announce the first of three Library 2.016 mini-conferences: "Privacy in the Digital Age," March 16th, 2016, from 12:00 - 3:00pm US-Pacific Time (click for your own time zone).

In this focused conversation, we will address the roles and responsibilities of libraries regarding the protections of intellectual freedom, privacy, free speech, information access, and freedom of the press. Are these still core values of the library profession, and if so, how are libraries and librarians responding to the increasing complexities of data tracking and desires for data-informed services and marketing?

We'll hear from a variety of library professionals as well as keynote Speakers: Lee Rainie; Director, Internet, Science, and Technology Research; Pew Research Center; Jamie Larue, Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom, American Library Association; Jonathan Hernández, Associate Researcher, Library and Information Institute, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); Deborah Caldwell-Stone, Deputy Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom, American Library Association; and Alison Macrina, Director, Library Freedom Project.

This is a free event. Please register to attend HERE.
Please also join this Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events.

Participants are encouraged to use #library2016 and #privacy on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS:
We will have a limited number of slots for presenter sessions. The call for proposals is HERE. We encourage all who are interested in presenting to submit.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:


Deborah Caldwell-Stone
Deputy Director, American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom

Deborah Caldwell-Stone is Deputy Director of the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom and the Freedom to Read Foundation. She is a recovering attorney and former appellate litigator who now works closely with librarians, library trustees and educators on a wide range of intellectual freedom and privacy issues, including book challenges, Internet filtering, meeting room policies, government surveillance, and the impact of new technologies on library patrons’ privacy and confidentiality. She has served on the faculty of the ALA-sponsored Lawyers for Libraries and Law for Librarians workshops and speaks frequently to librarians and library organizations around the country about intellectual freedom and privacy in libraries.
www.ala.org/offices/oif




Jonathan Hernández
Associate researcher in the Library and Information Institute at National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)
@jonhz

Jonathan Hernández, is an associate researcher in the Library and Information Institute at National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), also is a member of the board of the National Association of Librarians (CNB). His research interests include: Internet censorship, privacy and freedom of expression.
https://mx.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-hernandez-1b993224




Jamie Larue
Director, American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom
@jaslar

My name is James (Jamie) LaRue. I have been passionately in love with libraries since I was about 6 years old. I founded the Library Club in 7th Grade (really). I worked as a circulation clerk through college at the Normal Public Library in Normal, IL (the most misnamed town in America). I founded an all-volunteer library in rural Arivaca, AZ. I worked as a clerk and graduate assistant at the Graduate Library of the University of Illinois, in Urbana-Champaign. After a couple of other hops and skips, I became director of the county library system in Douglas County, Colorado, then ranked as one of the worst public libraries in the state. Sixteen years later, it was ranked as one of the top public libraries not just in the nation, but globally.

For a couple of years, I teamed up with some talented associates as a writer, speaker, and consultant. As of January, 2016, I have accepted a position as the director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom, and the Freedom to Read Foundation.
http://www.jlarue.com/




Alison Macrina
Director, Library Freedom Project
@flexlibris

Alison Macrina is a librarian, privacy activist, and the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, an initiative which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and law, and privacy-protecting technology tools to help safeguard digital freedoms. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger global struggles for justice, demystifying privacy and security technologies for ordinary users, and resisting an internet controlled by a handful of intelligence agencies and giant multinational corporations. When she’s not doing any of that, she’s reading.
https://libraryfreedomproject.org




Lee Rainie
Director of Internet, Science, and Technology Research | Pew Research Center
@lrainie

Lee Rainie is the Director of Internet, Science, and Technology research at the Pew Research Center, a non-profit, non–partisan “fact tank” that studies the social impact of the internet.

His Project was described by the American Sociological Association as the “most authoritative source of reliable data on the use and impact of the internet and mobile connectivity” and the ASA awarded him and the Internet Project its award for “excellence in the reporting on social issues award” in 2014.

The Project has issued more than 600 reports based on its surveys that examine people’s online activities and the internet’s role in their lives. The Center also has launched a sustained study of the intersection of science and society. All of its reports and datasets are available online for free at: http://www.pewinternet.org/.

Lee is a co-author of Networked: The new social operating system with sociologist Barry Wellman about the social impact of the internet and cell phones. He is also co-author of five books about the future of the internet that are based on Project surveys about the subject.

Prior to launching the Pew Internet Project, Lee was managing editor of U.S. News & World Report.
http://www.pewinternet.org/



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