Saturday, January 30, 2016

A Master Class in Giving an Online Keynote... from an 8th-grader.

Coco Kaleel, an 8th-grade maker, gives a keynote talk for the 2016 Student Technology Conference. The YouTube version is below, with her audio and with her slides. All 242 of them. Which she rocked, leaving plenty of time for Q+A.

Really, I'm not exaggerating. This is a great keynote talk.

For even more of a treat, watch the full Blackboard Collaborate version which shows her webcam video: https://sas.elluminate.com/dr.jnlp?sid=2008350&suid=D.4AE9A66499C3FCB5CB0984A603062B.


Friday, January 29, 2016

The 2016 Student Technology Conference Is Tomorrow! Keynotes and Speaker List Inside.

The second annual Student Technology Conference, a free one-day online event bringing together students, educators and innovators from around the world, is tomorrow, Saturday, January 30, 2016 from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm US-EST. We invite all to attend!

http://www.studenttechnologyconference.com

Attending: You can join us anywhere you have an Internet connection, and the schedule of sessions is published in each of the time zones in the world. Just find your time zone, find the sessions taking place, and click right into the ones you want to join. You can also import the entire calendar (Google) into your own calendar, or add selected sessions to your personal calendar to be sure that you don't miss them.

We also always need volunteer moderators--more info HERE.

Sessions:  All sessions are student-led! Times are US-EST, see the schedule for your own time zone and any updates.

9:00am

  • OPENING KEYNOTE: Mamadou Diallo - The Young Hackers

10:00am

  • "The Science of Small": An Introduction to Nanotechnology - Dallin Harper, junior
  • Benefits of social media in EFL classrooms - Quratulain Hussain
  • Oh Snap! -Connecting Students Through Snapchat - Eunice Daudu | Oh Snap! - Connecting Students Through Snapchat
  • Racket Buddy - Miriam Khazanov, Student/Inventor

11:00am

  • iBooks in the Classroom - 6th Grade Students
  • Not to use Social Media to impress people, but to impact people. - Simran Sehdev
  • To spread creativity and innovation through 3D designing by learning it in your classes. - Manav Maini
  • Video Technology and its Affect on a Lower School Environment - Katie Hayes

12:00pm

  • Silicon Alley Trek -- Forming Your Entrepreneurial Network - Andrew Blum, Founder and Director 
  • Small Talk about Small Tech - Sydney Sheren
  • Think Different Educational Tools 2016EdTechTools - Kirill Truhan(Think Different)

1:00pm

  • KEYNOTE: Coco Kaleel - Making Makers: A Drill Press is a Girl's Best Friend (A Boy's, too)

2:00pm

  • Social Entrepreneurship in Education: Engaging Students for Change - Tanmay Rao, Founder and Executive Director at Ankhor Inc.
  • Virtual Enterprises - Amy Demchak
  • Your 3D printed classroom: Bringing 3D printing to school projects - Olivia Fishman
3:00pm
  • Creating Global Citizens - Gurpreet kaur
  • How to Build Your Own Student-run, Non-profit Food Stand - Chloe Lombardi
  • L2T (Learn To Text) - Ben Neeman - Creator

4:00pm

  • Screenwriting Basics for Film and Other Media - Laney Blair, Film Student

5:00pm

  • KEYNOTE: Victoria Constant - Encouraging Girls' Interest in STEAM Through Programming with Scratch

6:00pm

  • An Introduction to Roots & Shoots and How it Uses Mapping to Serve - Molly Paul, Jane Goodall Institute Roots and Shoots National Youth Leadership Council Member
  • Developing Leadership Skills via Extracurricular Activities - Sophia Ling
  • Using Social Media to Motivate Students and Expand Classroom Boundaries - Grace Ling, College Student, Athlete, and Lifestyle Blogger

7:00pm

  • 1:1 Where every 1 matters - Brad Cooper, C.E.O of te Technology
  • How to Use 3d-Printing in Your Classes: 3d Printing Uses and Simple Designing - Bennett H and Carson P
  • Robotics: Our Journey and Discoveries - Cheyenne Brooks | Robotics: Our Journey and Discoveries

8:00pm

  • CLOSING KEYNOTE: Aruna Prasad - A Comprehensive Curriculum to Prepare Students for Innovation and Leadership in Technology

Keynotes:



Victoria Constant
Marymount School of New York

I am a high school senior interested in coding and computer science. I am proficient in basic HTML and CSS, and I am in the process of learning Java. Computer science interests me because I love having the ability to create tools for myself and for others that allow me to accomplish things like running my own website or coding applets that can filter photos or execute complex calculations with little effort. I taught a club for fourth and fifth grade girls at my school this past fall called "Introduction to Scratch" which introduced the girls to basic programming concepts through an easy-to-understand platform.
http://victoriaconstant.com/

Encouraging Girls' Interest in STEAM Through Programming with Scratch
This past fall, I taught a club in my old middle school for fourth and fifth grade girls called "Introduction to Scratch." My keynote covers what the club accomplished and why the effort to introduce more young girls to computer science is so important.



Mamadou Diallo
The Young Hackers

Mamadou is a hackathon guru currently in his senior year of high school. He enjoys coding websites and iOS apps in addition to solving problems that makes people's lives better. Mamadou is also the Co-founder of The Young Hackers, an organization dedicated to connecting and empowering a diverse new generation of programmers. Mamadou really enjoys playing basketball, procrastinating on Youtube, and freestyle rap-battling with his friends.

'I care about hacker communities because I believe that they are the ones that will solve society's biggest issues -- making the world a more equitable place.'
http://younghackers.us

The Young Hackers
The Young Hackers is a group of high school students dedicating to empowering the next generation of programmers. We do this through Hackathons, Learnathons, and Hackventures. In this keynote we will explain the importance of youth empowerment with technology and how it unlocks this maker mindset among students. We also will discuss how we ensure our hackathons are as diverse as possible in order to encourage a more diverse tech sector. Hackathons are the ultimate creative environments to express passions for technology and we believe there should be similar environments everywhere.



Coco Kaleel
Harvard-Westlake School

Coco Kaleel, an 8th grader from California, supports and inspires technology novices and enthusiasts with her website www.veryhappyrobot.com. Embracing 3D printing, coding, design software and even drones, Coco hopes to encourage her peers to make technology, not just consume it. With kit reviews and making tips, Coco tries to simplify the process for her audience to make it more accessible, whether simple blinky-lights or a full 3D printer kit. Coco had the honor to co-write the foreward to the recently published book The New Shop Class: Getting Started with 3D Printing, Arduino, and Wearable Tech from Apress Publishing. Coco’s appeared as a panelist on topics such as “Arduino Grassroots Revolution” and “Women in STEM” at Loscon40, did a poster presentation at 3D Printer World Expo, gave her talk “Girls and Robots” at the Texas Linux Fest in Austin, and recently delivered the conference warm-up and taught a soldering class to educators at the Design and Maker Class Colloquium. MAKE Magazine posted a blog about Coco and one of her mentors entitled “Soldering a Connection – The Start of a Mentoring Relationship” which was then translated for MAKE: Japan. Coco also enjoys fencing; field hockey; her school 3D printing, robotics, math, and Latin clubs; playing the oboe; and helping puppy-raise for Guide Dogs of America.
http://www.veryhappyrobot.com

Making Makers: A Drill Press is a Girl's Best Friend (A Boy's, too)
Coco hopes to help make makers and inspire innovators by demystifying technology and tools. She wants students and educators to not be intimidated by machinery that can help them collaboratively and creatively expand their worlds as makers. Coco’s “happy place” is in the garage or at her local hackerspace where she uses industrial laser cutters, a lathe, a drill press, a grinder/buffer, and saws like saber, fret, mitre, table, and hack. She makes projects ranging from a laser-cut logo on a student council suggestion box, to a Halloween costume illuminated with LEDs connected to a microprocessor, to 3D-printed camera mount brackets for her drone. She even fixed the family’s dishwasher for $1 using her soldering skills and an inexpensive part from the local electronics store. Coco advocates for girls and boys to have safe access to tools that once were common in shop classes in schools just a generation ago. For the next generation of problem solvers, Coco hopes that maker spaces in schools become as commonplace as soccer teams and scouts. Coco will walk the audience along her path with technology and discuss getting started with soldering, learning to use Arduino in projects, and understanding software to learn 3D printing. She’ll also highlight summer camps, publications and websites that inspired her. She’ll bring all of these elements together when she talks about her summer challenge to build a flying tri-copter by sourcing and making her own parts. The sky’s the limit when girls and boys have the tools.



Aruna Prasad
Spence School

Aruna Prasad is a junior at the Spence School in New York City. She is the founder of Nerdina, a forum for school girls interested in technology to learn and collaborate, which will then prepare them to innovate and lead. Most current initiatives meant for school girls focus on coding and not on developing a broad as well as a deep understanding needed to develop future innovators and leaders. For example, few students are aware of something as fundamental as how emails reach their destination by navigating the web. Through Nerdina, Aruna has launched a website (www.nerdina.org) as well as an iOS app as collaboration tools for Nerdinas from around the world. She has also developed a Nerdina Kit and recorded over 15 videos (posted on YouTube Channel, Nerdinas) as tools to learn fundamental technology concepts. She organizes an interschool event called Young Innovators Meet-up, featuring reputable speakers. Aruna’s interest in understanding the enablers of the digital revolution at a fundamental level started in middle school. She therefore discontinued from regular school and enrolled in a web-based school during 8th grade, spending much of her time in learning various aspects of software development and web technologies. She learned how to write device drivers using Python, develop iOS apps using Objective-C, create web forms using PHP and process data using MySQL. Her interest in understanding how technology products are developed led her to experiment with electronic circuits. She studied data networking concepts which form the backbone of the digital revolution that has enabled the explosive growth of the World Wide Web. She is presently interested in machine learning applications that can be deployed in smart sensors to improve quality of life for people. She is also keenly interested in big data, especially related to consumer and social media applications. Aruna co-leads the Current Events Club at Spence and enjoys playing the piano and the Indian classical violin. "Website - www.Nerdina.org YouTube Channel - Nerdinas (www.youtube.com/Nerdinas)
http://www.arunaprasad.com

A Comprehensive Curriculum to Prepare Students for Innovation and Leadership in Technology
The technology curriculum for schools is evolving but it has hardly kept pace with the evolution of technology itself. Educators that define technology curriculums have various ideas on what should be taught in schools based on their own perspectives. Therefore, the preparedness of students to take advantage of the huge opportunities in the field of technology depends largely on the school they attend. Some schools focus on computer programming classes while others encourage technology clubs such as Robotics. Most students that graduate from high schools do not have an understanding of the building blocks of the digital revolution (for example, most students are not aware of how an email travels from a sender to a recipient even after they have taken a course in computer programming). In order to prepare students for leadership and innovation in technology, it is important to develop a structure for technology education in middle schools and high schools that imparts in students a comprehensive understanding of the fundamentals. Technology education should be structured similar to the manner in which traditional subjects like English and Math are taught. Technology “grammar school” should build the fundamentals on which it will be easy for students to understand and grasp advanced concepts. My session on “A Comprehensive Curriculum to Prepare Students for Innovation and Leadership in Technology” will propose a technology curriculum for middle school and high school students with an emphasis on the building blocks imparted through practical learning. When students graduate from high school, they should be excited to participate in the digital revolution as contributors, innovators and leaders.

Help Promote the Conference: We can really use your help to share the conference with your colleagues, associates, friends, family (!), and the world.. Show your pride with a presenter, volunteer, sponsor, partner, or advisory board member badge.

Send a Tweet: “#stutechconf2016 is coming! Submit to present or register to attend, all free, all online, 6th year of this great event http://www.studenttechnologyconference.com”

We sure hope you will join us! See you online!

Saturday, January 23, 2016

GlobalEd.TV February Webinar - "How Do We Define Competence in Global Education?"

GlobalEd.TV presents:
"How Do We Define Competence in Global Education?"

Date + Time:
Monday February 1st
7pm EST
(Click on the time link to see the event time in your own time zone.)

Sign-up Link:
This is a free event, but you must register to attend and will be sent the event link. Sign up HERE.

Description:
Preparing students for participation in a global society is essential in the 21st century. What knowledge, attitudes and skills are necessary for navigating our cultural similarities and differences and how can educators promote competence? In Part I of this series, participants will explore Global and Cultural Competence, along with models for implementation.

Host:
Lisa Petro, Co-founder, Know My World
Lisa Petro is a Curriculum Development Consultant and the Co-founder of Know My World, a Global Education Resource organization. She has an Masters of Professional Studies in Humanistic and Multicultural Education from the State University of New York at New Paltz.  Lisa has designed curriculum and teacher training workshops in the United States, Japan, Nepal, China, Mexico, Albania, Palestine and Taiwan with an emphasis on social/emotional learning and cultural competence.  She has lived and taught in rural Japan as part of programming for the Ministry of Education and participated as the Curriculum Development Director for Everest of Apples (in collaboration with NEST NGO), which promotes quality education in developing countries. Lisa has also presented dynamic cross-cultural workshops at the East Asia Regional Conference for Overseas Schools in Bangkok, Thailand, EARCOS in Shanghai, China and Congreso de Preparatoria, Preparatorias del Tecnólogico de Monterrey, ITESM in Guadalajara, Mexico, the State University of New York Multicultural Education Conference, and the SUNY Collaborative Online Intercultural Learning conference in New York, NY. Lisa currently lives in New York and is a stand for creating connectivity and transformation through social, emotional and cultural learning.

Guests:

María José Pineda Garín
Calidad Académica Vicerrectoria de Preparatoria
Tecnológico de Monterrey
Ed. M, Maria Jose Pineda is Academic Director at the High School Vice-Rectorate at Tecnológico de Monterrey, with over 27 years experience working in secondary education. She was the High School Principal at Campus Eugenio Garza Sada, Tecnológico de Monterrey from 2001 to 2013. Maria Jose has coordinated and participated in different Institutional Projects at Tecnológico de Monterrey, related with the Design and Implementation of High School Curricula at a national level, as well as projects in Educational Innovation at Prepa Tec.

Christi Hunter
CEO, Global Leadership Excellence
Christi Hunter is the CEO of Global Leadership Excellence, LLC and the President of Global Competence Consulting, LLC where she works to assess, prepare, and enhance the global workforce of tomorrow. She is a primary author of the Global Competence Aptitude Assessment (GCAA)®, which is a research and diagnostic tool that measures the global readiness of students and working professionals around the world, and then determines areas that would benefit from additional development.

About GlobalEd.TV:
GlobalEd TV is a free inclusive and  comprehensive webinar series which spotlights theories and best practices related to multiculturalism in schools and organizations all over the world. This 5 part series is designed to inform educators, students and parents about the role of cultural and global competence in  education. Hosted twice a month by the Global Education Conference Network, the Learning Revolution, and Know My World, participants will be included in global conversations with featured experts , practitioners and organizations in the field, with the goal of exploring the impact of global education. Through themed sessions, interviews, dynamic examples, Q&A, and practical exercises, each one-hour segment will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to bring global competence to their schools and communities.

Friday, January 22, 2016

Special Update for #STUTECH2016 Presenters + Potential Presenters

The second annual Student Technology Conference is a week from tomorrow!  This is a free one-day online event bringing together students, educators and innovators from around the world, will be held Saturday, January 30, 2016 from 9 Am to 9 Pm EST. Anyone can attend.

Deadline to Submit Presentations: the deadline to submit presentation proposals is end-of-day Monday, January 25th. There's still time to get a proposal in and to present!

Presenters with Accepted Proposals: It is important that you join the presenters group HERE and that you have scheduled your presentation time. Information on scheduling your presentation time was sent to you by email. If you cannot find that email, please contact Lucy Gray HERE. You must also watch the recording of or participate in a training session so that you know how the conference platform works, how to upload your slides, and make sure your computer, microphone, and webcam (optional) work in the system. Information on the training is HERE.

Presenters with Proposals Not Accepted Yet: You should also make sure you have joined the presenters group and that you have prepared by taking or attending a training. Any proposals not yet accepted have had notes added to them indicating what you would need to change or improve in order to have your proposal accepted, and those changes need to be made by Monday, the 25th as well, to be re-considered. We hope you will update them and be prepared to present!

Volunteering: One of the best parts of this conference is the incredible volunteer effort to help new (and sometimes seasoned!) presenters. Volunteers gather throughout the whole conference in a special virtual lounge and work to make sure that presenters and attendees are given help whenever they need it. Our volunteers are an elite group of global helpers--come find out why they say being a volunteer moderator is the most fun you can have at the conference. More HERE.

Everyone Else (Those Not Presenting or Volunteering): Get ready for a GREAT conference. Keynote speakers are being announced this weekend, and mid-next week we'll post and email the full schedule of speakers. Be sure to join the conference network at http://www.studenttechnologyconference.com, follow the Tweets at #stutech2016, and let everyone you can know about this free event organized by students.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

ISTE "unplugged" - 10th Anniversary! Dates are set...

2016 ISTEunplugged plans starting to shape up. Our 10th year! We'll update http://www.isteunplugged.com shortly as the details start getting coordinated.

Hack Education, the flagship unconference (it all started with EduBloggerCon in Atlanta in 2007), will be all day Saturday, June 25th, with our regular party afterwards (thanks to Promethean again)!

Sunday will be our Global Education Day event.

And there are some more fun ideas percolating... How do you think we should celebrate 10 years? Stay tuned here!

Wednesday, January 13, 2016

The Edupreneur Podcast, Episode 47: Is Education Conforming or Liberating? with Steve Hargadon

Audio interview with Zack Baker and Pete Freeman from The Edupreneur: a podcast exploring entrepreneurship and innovation in education from last September.

Some selected quotes:
  • "In a lot of ways, I think that's what we are trying to do in education--which is to reclaim learning. Take it back from these industrial processes models to what learning truly is, which is a personal, individual experience, where we capture a vision of our ability to learn about the world and make a difference."
  • "Because I think what you learn as an educational entrepreneur, or someone who seeks to create new things in education, is that your vision, the interests of other people, and the reality of what can be accomplished are in a constant tug-of-war; and you never know where that is going to land. So unless you are willing to try things out, and then see how the audience responds, you're not going to put yourself in a position for something to 'catch'... and not everything catches. In fact, a significant number of things don't catch. You have an idea or a vision, and you think, 'OK, this is exciting and interesting,' and it's really hard to catch. Because maybe it's not a great idea, or maybe people aren't ready for it, or maybe you're not ready for it."
  • "... she said, 'I wasn't one of the smart ones,' and it just kind-of triggered something in me. I got to thinking about what percentage of students drop out of school, and then what percentage of students would actually say that, that 'I wasn't one of the smart ones,' so it led me on this journey of asking just about everybody I interact with, 'What was your school experience like?' And it's kind of shocking how often I hear almost those exact same words... if you just talk to sort-of average, regular people, you realize that one of the things schools do really well is that they communicate to a significant percentage of the students that they are not good learners. And I thought, 'this is tragic.' At some level, in terms of our core beliefs about what education should do for people, everybody should leave school believing they are capable of something. So why is it that our system leaves so many feeling like failures?" 
  • "OK, it's called Deschooling Society. It is not an easy read. It's Ivan Illich from the 1970's who basically talked about the way in which schools are perpetuated in institutions and the way that institutions perpetuate problems rather than solve them. You have to think about that and you have to kind-of spend time on it, but it's a really interesting idea, right, so the idea would be that the medical-pharmaceutical industry actually has to perpetuate illness to stay in business, rather than promoting health; or the banking industry needs you to be dependent financially rather than be independent. So his view was that school actually was the model for all of that. It's a deep topic and it's a hard read, but that's my recommendation." 
  • "My definition of education is the ability to draw out of a learner (you know I'm going to the Latin here) their innate capacity to learn and grow and improve."
  • "So you have to understand that I believe that education is a process, and that it's a highly people-driven endeavor. And so I don't think there is anything that you can create that will scale and become 'the solution' because learning takes place individually and [is the] process of becoming a learner... I'd create a way for people to talk to each other, because I believe that it is in that process of communicating with each other that the growth takes place."
  • "Cui Bono?  It's the Latin for 'who benefits?' Until you start looking at the way in which people benefit from actions, you miss the larger story of why things happen in our culture and society. Our last daughter took AP World History and you begin to discover that the story of world history is the story of power and control. It's really important to become a discerning citizen or individual and understand that the reason that people tell you do they do things is not always that they do things. So it's important to look behind at why things are done and who benefits from the way things are done."

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Announcing the 2016 Student Technology Conference

The second annual Student Technology Conference, a free one-day online event bringing together students, educators and innovators from around the world, will be held Saturday, January 30, 2016 from 9 Am to 9 Pm EST. We invite all to attend!

The Student Technology Conference provides an international forum for the presentation, discussion and sharing of educational technology in schools and other academic settings. This conference, by students in grades 6-12 as well as colleges and universities and for all, is committed to:
  • Fostering a better understanding of how students use technology in education and to engage students, teachers and administrators in a conversation about technology.
  • Assisting teachers and administrators in understanding how students use technology both in and out of the classroom.
  • Strengthening the relationship between students, teachers and administrators about technology in the curriculum.
Last year’s conference featured more than twenty general sessions and four keynote addresses from all over the world with over 500 participants!

If you haven't joined us before, this is an amazing, engaging, collaborative, worldwide event that you will want to be a part of. You can join us for just for one session, or for every session! Even if you miss a session, they are all recorded so you can watch them later!


Attending: You can join us anywhere you have an Internet connection, and the schedule of sessions is published in each of the time zones in the world. Just find your time zone, find the sessions taking place, and click right into the ones you want to join. You can also import the entire calendar (Google) into your own calendar, or add selected sessions to your personal calendar to be sure that you don't miss them.

Presenting: For those interested in presenting (and we encourage students around the world to do so, even if for the first time), the call for proposals is now open! The final date to submit a proposal is Saturday, January 23, 2016. Click HERE for more information and to submit your proposal.

Volunteering: One of the best parts of this conference is the incredible volunteer effort to help new (and sometimes seasoned!) presenters. Volunteers gather throughout the whole conference in a special virtual lounge and work to make sure that presenters and attendees are given help whenever they need it. Our volunteers are an elite group of global helpers--come find out why they say being a volunteer moderator is the most fun you can have at the conference. More HERE.

The Community: A significant bonus to attending the Student Technology Conference is joining the conference community of students and educators from around the world.

Great Keynotes: Who better to keynote the Student Technology Conference than students. We have a great set of keynote speakers this year, including the Young Hackers of New York City and Coco Kaleel from veryhappyrobot.com. More keynotes will be announced after the holidays!

Sponsors: We've got a devoted and most-appreciated set of sponsors who make this conference possible (and keep it free!). Our special thanks to Marymounyt School of New York, University School of Milwaukee, Westhampton Middle School, Lauriston Girls’ School and others who support our conference. And there's still time to join this illustrious group and help support our event! Email steve@hargadon.com.

Help Promote the Conference: We can really use your help to share the conference with your colleagues, associates, friends, family (!), and the world.. Show your pride with a presenter, volunteer, sponsor, partner, or advisory board member badge.

Send a Tweet: “#stutechconf2016 is coming! Submit to present or register to attend, all free, all online, 6th year of this great event http://www.studenttechnologyconference.com”

We sure hope you will join us! See you online,

Ana Sophia, Gaby, Eunice, Anne, and Sydney
Conference Co-Coordinators (we're all students)
2016 Student Technology Conference