Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Announcing Library 2.018: "Social Crisis Management in a 21st Century World" - October 17


We're excited to announce our third Library 2.018 mini-conference: "Social Crisis Management in a 21st Century World," which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, October 17th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

This event is being organized in partnership with Patty Wong, Director of Library Services at Santa Monica Public Library.

Our human condition has changed dramatically and has implications for libraries of all types on a global scale. Food insecurity and hunger, housing policies and homelessness, violence, mental health service needs, social, economic, educational and racial equity, substance abuse and drug overdose – all of these and many more challenges impact the people who frequent our libraries – as customers, students, faculty, and staff. Operational decisions continue to be influenced by social concerns. Join us for a series of conversations on how libraries have developed, responded, and championed programs and services to address some of these social crises and learn about outcomes. What’s the new normal for libraries in this world of social and economic disparity? Has it altered or enhanced our core mission?

This is a free event, being held online.
REGISTER HERE
to attend live or to receive the recording links afterwards. Please also join this Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to participate in this event. The call for proposals is now open HERE.

Participants are encouraged to use #library2018 and #librarysocialcrisis on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

KEYNOTES:




Patty Wong
Director of Library Services for the Santa Monica Public Library (California)

Patricia Wong is the Director of Library Services for the Santa Monica Public Library (SMPL) system in California. Previously, she served as the Yolo County Library Director for nine years. Before her tenure leading the nine locations of the Yolo County Library system, Wong was the Deputy Director of Library Services of the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library. There, she managed the daily operations of the Central Library and its 12 branches. She has also held positions as Library Program Manager for Children’s Services in the Oakland Public Library and Supervising Librarian and Children’s Librarian for the Berkeley Public Library. Wong has co-authored nearly a dozen publications and has held many elected posts for national organizations such as the American Library Association, the United States Board on Books for Young People, and the Chinese American Librarians Association. She has also held a part-time faculty position at San Jose State University’s iSchool of Library and Information Science. In 2013, she received the California Library Association’s Member of the Year Award. Wong holds both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Library and Information Science from UC Berkeley.
https://smpl.org



Ryan Dowd
Executive Director of Hesed House

Ryan is the Executive Director of a large homeless shelter outside of Chicago, Illinois. ​He regularly travels the country training libraries, police departments, schools and other organizations on how to work compassionately with difficult homeless individuals. ​Ryan is the author of the ALA book, The Librarian's Guide to Homelessness.
http://www.homelesslibrary.com/



Rebekkah Smith Aldrich
Executive Director at the Mid-Hudson Library System in New York

Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, MLS, is the Executive Director at the Mid-Hudson Library System in New York where for 20 years she has assisted 66 public libraries in the areas of governance, management, funding and facilities. Rebekkah is a certified Sustainable Building Advisor (NaSBA), Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP) and a holds an advanced certificate in Public Library Administration from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University. Rebekkah is the Library Sustainability columnist for Library Journal, author of Sustainable Thinking: Ensuring Your Library's Future in an Uncertain World [ALA Editions], Resilience (part of American Library Association's Center for the Future Series) [ALA Editions], author of the Handbook for New Public Library Directors in New York State and co-author of the Handbook for Library Trustees in New York State. Rebekkah is co-founder of the New York Library Associaton's Sustainability Initiative and in 2017-2018 Rebekkah served as co-chair of the ALA Special Task Force on Sustainability. Rebekkah is a Library Journal Mover & Shaker and past president of the Leadership & Management Section (LAMS) of the New York Library Association.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebekkahaldrich/

MORE INFORMATION:
The School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.

Wednesday, June 06, 2018

ISTE or NOT? Either way, we have great ways for you to participate: Global Ed Day, Hack Education, and edtech.world

Are you attending the 2018 ISTE conference in Chicago this month? Or wishing you were? Either way, we have three fun opportunities for you to participate--some in-person, or all online.


1. HACK (YOUR) EDUCATION, Saturday, June 23rd, all day at McCormick Place. Hack Education is the 12th annual all-day unconference held the Saturday before ISTE (not to be confused with upstart Microsoft's copycat event!). It's a great day for beginners and regular attendees alike--a community experience filled with interesting conversations in a highly social environment. To "hack" is to do something effective, even if it's not the standard or expected way. This year, for Hack Education, our loose theme is going to be how your hack your own education - thus, "Hack (Your) Education." Plus we'll have a special panel discussion on helping students hack their education. The physical event has been sold out (345) seats but we've just freed up five more spots, first-come, first-serve. After that, do consider getting on the wait-list, if you'll be at ISTE, through their registration process. ONLINE: participate online by joining the event portal at http://www.Hackeducation.online (or here), where we have a great set of community discussion questions (see the "DISCUSS" tab) about how you and others "hack your education." We'll also use the portal to give information on hopefully streaming the panel on student learning.



2. GLOBAL EDUCATION DAY, Sunday, June 24th from 2-5 PM at McCormick Place. This is a special face-to-face meeting in which you can connect and collaborate with other globally-minded educators. More information here. The physical event is sold out (255), but you can get on the relatively short wait-list (22 right now) through the ISTE registration portal. ONLINE: participate online with the physical attendees and other global educators by registering (free) at go.participate.com/global-ed-day-18. We will be streaming live on our Facebook page some of our activities for those who cannot attend in person: https://www.facebook.com/globaledcon/.


3. edtech.world, our brand new worldwide conference on technology and learning, online and free, September 12 - 14, 2018. A joint project of LearningRevolution.com and GlobalEdEvents.org. We've held 75 events over 13 years, with over 150,000 registered attendees - edtech.world will be our biggest and best event ever. Sign up now to be kept informed, to express interest in presenting, or to sponsor.



Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Announcing the Worldwide Conference on Technology and Learning


Lucy Gray and I are pleased to announce the ultimate event for technology and education: the edtech.world conference, September 12 - 14, 2018, online and with free registration.

Together, Lucy and I have run over 75 events in the last 13 years, with over 150,000 registered attendees. This event will be our biggest ever.

We will be announcing our first stage keynotes and sponsors at the ISTE annual conference in Chicago at the end of this month. Until then, you can register to attend, indicate a desire to present, or inquire about sponsorship at www.edtech.world.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Blockchain and Libraries? Yes! Mini-conference Schedule Posted + Resource Guide


Our second Library 2.018 mini-conference, "Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession," is next week! Join us online (and for free) on Thursday, June 7th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone). We've also just posted the session schedule, which you'll find below.


This event is being organized in partnership with Drs. Sue Alman and Sandra Hirsh from the San Jose State University School of Information as part of their IMLS-funded investigation of the potential uses of blockchain technology for the information professions.

Speakers will include: Dan Blackaby, Todd A. Carpenter, Frank Cervone, Christina CornejoMichael Della Bitta, Miguel Figueroa, Patricia C. Franks, Toby Greenwalt, Jason Griffey, M Ryan Hess, Amy Jiang, Stacey Johnson, Bohyun Kim, Heather A. McMorrow, Eric Meyer, Robert Norton, Tonia San Nicolas-Rocca, Ravi Singh, and Link Swanson.


Blockchain technology has the potential for libraries to accomplish much more than housing electronic credentials. The technology enables a broader impact within the community and around the globe. Some suggestions being explored for blockchain applications in libraries include building an enhanced metadata center, protecting Digital First Sale rights, supporting community-based collections, and facilitating partnerships across organizations. This mini-conference will provide participants with an overview of blockchain technology and information about current applications within the information professions. Join the discussion on ways that blockchain technology can be used in libraries. https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains. See below for a list of the mini-conference topics, and full descriptions at http://www.library20.com/page/blockchain.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to participate in this event.

This is a free event, being held online.
REGISTER HERE
...to attend live or to receive the recording links afterwards, and also to receive the "Library Blockchain Bonus Guide" with 95 special resource links! Please also join the Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events

Participants are encouraged to use #library2018 and #libraryblockchain on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

SCHEDULE:
12:00 PM (US-PDT)

Opening Keynote: "Blockchain Explained"
Jason Griffey, Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

12:30 PM (US-PDT)

Blockchain Panel / Roundtable (1 Hour):
  • "Legal Concerns about Blockchain That May Not Have Occurred to You"
    Dan Blackaby, Head of Technologies Initiatives, Cornell University Law Library 
  • "What Might Standards for Library Blockchain Systems Look Like?"
    Todd A. Carpenter, Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization (NISO) 
  • "Using Blockchains to Authenticate and Preserve Public Discourse"
    Michael Della Bitta, Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America 
  • "Security in Libraries: A Case for Blockchain Technology"
    Tonia San Nicolas-Rocca, Assistant Professor, School of Information at San Jose State University 
1:30 PM (US-PDT)

"From Healthcare to Information Organizations: Translating Blockchain Practice Across Disciplines"
Frank Cervone, Director of Information Technology, School of Public Health at University of Illinois at Chicago

"Applying Blockchain to the Information Professions"
Christina Cornejo, Graduate Student, San Jose State University
Stacey Johnson, Technical Services Librarian at Chino Valley Public Library and MLIS Student, San Jose State University iSchool

"Blockchain Technology for Recordkeeping"
Patricia C. Franks, PhD, CA, CRM, IGP, MARA Program Coordinator, Professor, School of Information, San Jose State University

"Setting up a Blockchain for the Public Library"
Ravi Singh, Executive Director, Demco Inc.

2:00 PM (US-PDT)

"Community-based Collections - Extending the Library through Blockchain"
M Ryan Hess, Library Services Manager - Digital Initiatives, Palo Alto City Library

"Credentialing using Blockchain for Globally Mobile and Disaster Affected Populations"
Amy Jiang, Library Technology Coordinator
Heather A. McMorrow, Instructional Designer & Program Manager

"Blockchain and a Fair Art Market"
Eric Meyer, Professor of Social Informatics, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
Robert Norton, CEO and co-founder of Verisart

"Strategies for Libraries to Provide Blockchain Education, Tools, and Training"
Link Swanson, Systems Engineer, Minitex, PhD Candidate Cognitive Science, University of Minnesota

2:30 PM (US-PDT)

Closing Keynote - Pros + Concerns
  • Miguel Figueroa, Center for the Future of Libraries, American Library Association 
  • Toby Greenwalt, ‎Director of Digital Strategy and Technology Implementation - ‎Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
  • Bohyun Kim, Chief Technology Officer and Associate Professor at the University of Rhode Island Libraries

MORE INFORMATION:

The full mini-conference information page is at http://www.library20.com/page/blockchainThe School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.


Funding for this project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services – LG-98-17-0209-17. The views, presentations, conclusions or recommendations expressed on this website or in the conference do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.




Monday, May 14, 2018

Blockchain Applied - Library 2.0 Mini Conference + Resource Bonus Guide


Our second Library 2.018 mini-conference, "Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession,"  will be held online (and for free) on Thursday, June 7th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).


This event is being organized in partnership with Drs. Sue Alman and Sandra Hirsh from the San Jose State University School of Information as part of their IMLS-funded investigation of the potential uses of blockchain technology for the information professions.

Speakers will include: Dan Blackaby, Todd A. Carpenter, Frank Cervone, Christina CornejoMichael Della Bitta, Miguel Figueroa, Patricia C. Franks, Toby Greenwalt, Jason Griffey, M Ryan Hess, Amy Jiang, Stacey Johnson, Bohyun Kim, Heather A. McMorrow, Eric Meyer, Robert Norton, Tonia San Nicolas-Rocca, Ravi Singh, and Link Swanson.


Blockchain technology has the potential for libraries to accomplish much more than housing electronic credentials. The technology enables a broader impact within the community and around the globe. Some suggestions being explored for blockchain applications in libraries include building an enhanced metadata center, protecting Digital First Sale rights, supporting community-based collections, and facilitating partnerships across organizations. This mini-conference will provide participants with an overview of blockchain technology and information about current applications within the information professions. Join the discussion on ways that blockchain technology can be used in libraries. https://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains. See below for a list of the mini-conference topics, and full descriptions at http://www.library20.com/page/blockchain.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to participate in this event.

This is a free event, being held online.
REGISTER HERE
...to attend live or to receive the recording links afterwards, and also to receive the "Library Blockchain Bonus Guide" with 95 special resource links! Please also join the Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events

Participants are encouraged to use #library2018 and #libraryblockchain on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

CURRENT SESSION TOPICS:
  • Opening Keynote – Blockchain Explained
  • Applying Blockchain to the Information Professions 
  • Blockchain and a Fair Art Market
  • Community-based Collections - Extending the Library through Blockchain
  • Credentialing using Blockchain for Globally Mobile and Disaster Affected Populations
  • From Healthcare to Information Organizations: Translating Blockchain Practice Across Disciplines
  • Legal Concerns about Blockchain That May Not Have Occurred to You
  • Security in Libraries: A Case for Blockchain Technology
  • Strategies for Libraries to Provide Blockchain Education, Tools, and Training
  • Using Blockchains to Authenticate and Preserve Public Discourse
  • What Might Standards for Library Blockchain Systems Look Like?
  • Closing Keynote - Blockchain Pros / Cons / Concerns
MORE INFORMATION:
The School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.


Funding for this project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services – LG-98-17-0209-17. The views, presentations, conclusions or recommendations expressed on this website or in the conference do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.




Saturday, May 05, 2018

The "Game of School" Survey

Do you think that school is a game?

That is, do you think that students "succeed" (graduate, navigate college admissions well, or leave school psychologically healthy) more from learning how to play the game than from actually learning academic subjects well?

What percentage of students in your school (or in general) do you believe leave school confident, competent, and in control of their lives and their learning?

Do you personally know any students who have left school feeling that they are not good learners, that they are "not one of the smart ones," or even that they are "defective" or "broken?"

Do you have specific strategies that you use or teach to help students navigate and succeed at the game aspect of schooling? What are they?

My survey asks these questions and a few more about the frustrations, fears, anger, hopes and dreams, opportunities, and strengths of students, teachers, parents, and others. It's being sent to my email list of 150,000+. I'll share the results on my blog.


After you fill out this survey for yourself (you'll get a copy of all your answers at the end so you can keep them), some of you might find value in organizing a way to ask these questions of students, parents, and teachers in a physical meeting--and then having a very real discussion about their answers and the thinking behind those answers.

If you decide to do this, please email me about the experience.

With sincere thanks,

Steve Hargadon
SteveHargadon.com
steve@learningrevolution.com

Monday, April 30, 2018

The 2018 Global Education Fair (Online) Is Now Open!


Our 2018 Global Education Fair is now open and runs all this week, April 30 - May 4!

Looking to take your school global? Working on a classroom global-connection project? Come learn about and connection with global organizations and projects in our free, virtual, online exhibit hall for teachers and school districts. Registration (free) is required.

The Global Education Fair (GlobalEdFair.org) is modeled after traditional vendor or college fairs, but takes place entirely online, allowing participants from all corners of the world to access information about the best global education resources and programs.

The "exhibit hall" will be open for viewing the whole week starting today, Monday, April 30th, to learn about the work of leading global educators, companies and nonprofit organizations from their description and video previews. Live chat will then be available this Friday from 2:00 - 5:00 pm US Eastern Daylight Time (click for your own time zone)--you can click into live virtual session "booths" to talk or ask questions of organization representatives to find out about their tools, services, projects, and programs related to globally connected teaching and learning.



Current Exhibitors:
  • ASCD
  • Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)
  • California Global Education Project
  • CATO Middle College High School / Harvesting Humanity
  • CCS Global Sustainable Goals Map Project (U.S)
  • The Choices Program, Brown University
  • Digital Promise Global - MY World 360º
  • EMPATICO
  • Flat Connections
  • Fulbright Teacher Exchange Programs
  • Global Citizens @ Work
  • Global Ed Events
  • Global Education Alaska
  • Global Oneness Project
  • iEARN-USA
  • IESTP SIMON BOLIVAR
  • Know My World
  • Multilingual Multicultural Multimedia: New York Institute of Technology
  • The MY HERO Project
  • The NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellowship
  • One Globe Kids
  • OneWorld Classrooms
  • Peace Corps: World Wise Schools
  • Primary Source: Educating Global Citizens
  • Qatar Foundation International
  • SIMA Classroom
  • Technology For A Cause - Enhancing  Skills Empowering Kids
  • US History in a Global Context
  • Virtual Exchange Programs at IREX
  • WAC-DC
  • The Well-Being Wheel as a Tool for Reimagining School
  • World MOON Project
  • World Savvy
  • World View, UNC-CH
See you online!