Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Library 2.0 Webinar - "Security for Rural Librarians" on August 13th



"SECURITY FOR RURAL LIBRARIANS: STAYING SAFE AT WORK WHEN HELP IS FAR."

Join us for a 60-minute webinar, recorded in a special Library 2.0 series with Dr. Steve Albrecht, held live on Tuesday, August 13th, 2019, at 4:00 pm Eastern Standard Time. 



Register to attend live, or to have access to the recordings, by clicking on the JOIN WEBINAR button HERE.
(
You will need to be logged into Library 2.0--if you are not yet a member, you can join for free here.)


OVERVIEW
: If you define yourself as a Rural Librarian, see if these scenarios sound familiar:
  • A man comes in and asks you for the time. You tell him and he nods and goes to sit at nearby table, where he just stares at you for the next two hours . . .
  • A female comes in and tells you she is living on the streets. She asks if she can use your restroom. She goes inside and locks the door. An hour later and she’s still in there . . .
  • A group of local teenagers come into your library and start messing with your displays, rolling the book carts around, and making noise. You ask them to leave and they refuse . . .
  • A man who is angry at the county comes into your library to ask you for legal advice. When you tell him you cannot give him that type of help, he takes a gun out of his backpack and places it on the counter.
If you work in a city or county library in an active neighborhood in a larger community, you would know how to address each of these by getting help from a co-worker, by asking a supervisor to speak to these people, by disengaging and doing your work at another part of the facility, or even by going into a back room and calling the police from a safe place. However, if you work in a rural library location--which can be defined as having a police or sheriff’s response that could be 20 minutes to an hour away, working alone in the building, or working in a one-room facility, with only one way in or out--these options aren’t always available.

This webinar is here to help.

AUDIENCE: This webinar program is for all library employees who work in rural areas, as well as the library leadership that supervises these facilities, especially from a distance.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
  • Know how and when to use “high-risk customer service skills” with difficult or challenging patrons.
  • Being firm, fair, consistent, reasonable, and assertive in your application of your Code of Conduct. 
  • Trusting your intuition when working alone. Should you stay or go?
  • Setting up help systems: phone trees, code words, exit and evacuation plans.
  • Improving your physical security: panic alarms, OC pepper spray, better door hardware, remote locking devices, safe rooms.
  • The value of Security Incident Reports.
  • How to get better results from your law enforcement agencies.

COST: $98
/person - includes access to the recording and access to the attendee discussion forum. For group discounts, to submit a purchase order, or for any registration difficulties or questions, email steve@learningrevolution.com.

TO REGISTER: Click on the JOIN WEBINAR button HERE. You will first need to be a member of Library 2.0 (free) and be logged in. Please click "Sign Up" on the top right and we'll approve you quickly.
DR. STEVE ALBRECHT
Dr. Steve Albrecht has trained library audiences for 19 years. In 2015, the ALA published his book, Library Security. He holds a doctoral degree in Business Administration, an MA in Security Management, a BS in Psychology, and a BA in English. He is board certified in HR, security, coaching, and threat management. He worked for the San Diego Police Department for 15 years. He has written 21 books on business, security, and criminal justice subjects.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Hack Education - The Unconference, Saturday, June 22 - OPEN TO ALL


HACK EDUCATION - THE UNCONFERENCE
Loews Philadephia Hotel - Washington Ballroom
Saturday, June 22nd, 2019

This is the 13th year of this our free education unconference. In previous years, this event has been part of a series of grass-roots activities called ISTE Unplugged. This year we're just holding the unconference, and while still supported by ISTE, it will be offsite (Loews Philadephia Hotel - 1200 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19107) so that those who aren't registered for ISTE can still attend. There will not be an after-party this year.

Please invite any an all educators, students, parents, librarians, administrators, or interested parties. You do not need to sign up in advance to attend Hack Education. See more information at www.hackeducation.org. The site will be updated with any information about the event.

2019's CONTROVERSIAL THEME: "The Learning Revolution (Has It Disappeared?)"

The advent of the Internet promised social and learning benefits from increases in access, content, individual voice, collaboration, and opportunity. Increasingly in the past few years, however, we're seeing dramatic struggles play out in media, governance, and education for narrative power and control--not unlike the ways in which the advent of the printing press created similar battles.

Rather than ushering in enlightened democratic dialog, social media and the web seem to have created an environment rife with propaganda, fake news, and mob-like behavior. Censorship is increasingly replacing thoughtful debate, and civil dialog has become increasingly rare. The building of cognitive and logical tools for independent thinking are being displaced by demands for agreement on whatever is the current "group-think" topic of the day.

Hack Education's thematic focus this year will be on supporting and maintaining individual intellectual development, digital freedom, privacy, and agency--specifically as core parts of the mission of education and as they relate to educational technology. How do educators and educational institutions guard against control, censorship, propaganda, indoctrination, and compliance-based thinking? What Is the role of schools and libraries for safeguarding intellectual freedom, privacy, and agency?

But remember, Hack Education is an "unconference," and in true unconference tradition, you are welcome to propose and discuss any topic you would like!

THE UNCONFERENCE FORMAT + SCHEDULE

An unconference starts with participants writing, on large sheets of paper, topics they are interested in discussing during the day. There is then time for "voting" or indicating on other people's sheets your interest in those topics. At which point a schedule is created for the day making sure that the most popular sessions don't conflict with each other.  Participants then spend the day in the conversation groups that are of interest to them, with full freedom to move around at any time.

8:00 a.m.: Doors Open. Early volunteers welcome to help with setup! Session creation documents get started, time to also mingle and socialize.
9:00 a.m.: Official Start and Session Creation Process
9:40 a.m.: Welcome
10:00 - 10:55 a.m.: Conversations (SET 1)
11:00 - 11:55 a.m.: Conversations (SET 2)
11:55 a.m.: Group photo
12:00 - 2:00 p.m.: Lunch and informal conversations on your own.
2:00 - 2:55 p.m.: Conversations (SET 3)
3:00 - 3:55 p.m.: Conversations (SET 4)

SPONSOR


If you're looking for Audrey Watters' Hack Education site, it's at http://www.HackEducation.com. Many thanks to her for letting me use the same name for our event.

Monday, June 10, 2019

Join Us for Global Education Day at ISTE in Philadelphia - Sunday, June 23rd


Global Education Day, our annual meet-up for global educators, takes place at the International Society for Technology in Education Conference (ISTE) on Sunday, June 23rd, from 2:30 - 5:15 pm at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

Join Lucy Gray, Steve Hargadon, and many members of the Global Education Conference community for a special face-to-face meeting in which you can connect and collaborate with other globally-minded educators. This is a great way to meet others before the official start of the ISTE conference!

This participatory event will feature:
  • A special guest appearance by design thinker and educator Don Buckley
  • Inspirational ignite talks by noted educators and organizations working to connect classrooms
  • Design activities related to bringing the UN's Sustainable Development Goals into schools
  • A global resource cool tools smackdown in which attendees will share the best resources and tools for creating global experiences for students
  • Resources from participating global education non-profit organizations

This year, noted educator and design-thinking guru Don Buckley will be facilitating modified design thinking activities to help educators contemplate incorporating the UN's Sustainable Development Goals into schools. Don will give a short keynote, lead us through ideation and affinity mapping activities, and then our assembled group will vote on the best ideas. Interspersed throughout this workshop will be ignite talks and global resource sharing.

PLEASE NOTE: you must be registered to attend the ISTE conference in order to attend the Global Education Day. While ISTE requires a registration fee, Global Education Day does not require an additional fee. Our event will have limited seating and there is no pre-registration for the event itself--attendees will be admitted on a first come, first served basis starting at 2 pm that day.

More information is available here and here.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

"Open Data" Mini-Conference - June 5th - Session Detail Added


We've added information on the accepted sessions for the second Library 2.019 mini-conference: "Open Data," which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, June 5th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone). We already have 2300 registrations, but we're unlimited in size, so we hope you will join us!

Local, state and federal governments are releasing data - the public's data - in new ways. Property maps, 311 data, school quality information and census statistics - all of these are examples of open data that give people the tools they need to learn and advocate for their causes. This web conference will explore how librarians are using open data, teaching others about it, and even creating it. You’ll learn about tools you can implement in your own library and hear stories from libraries that have partnered with their local and state governments. Armed with practical tools and experiences, you’ll be ready to start diving into open data to help your library and community!

This is a free event, being held live online and also recorded.
REGISTER HERE
to attend live and/or to receive the recording links afterward.
Please also join the Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to participate in this event. The call for proposals is open now at https://www.library20.com/page/call-for-proposalsWe will also need volunteer moderators for sessions rooms--if you've been through our training before (and even if you haven't!), email steve@learningrevolution.com if you might be able to help.

Participants are encouraged to use #library2019 and #libraryopendata on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

KEYNOTE PANEL:



Anne Neville-Bonilla (Keynote Moderator)
Director, of the California Research Bureau, California State Library

Anne Neville-Bonilla is director of the California Research Bureau where she and her team develop non-partisan, independent research for the Governor and Legislature. As part of the California State Library’s Executive team, she is co-director a Knight Foundation grant to support open data literacy in public libraries and communities and serves on the board of CENIC, California’s research and education broadband network. Previously, she directed the State Broadband Initiative at the National Telecommunications + Information Administration (NTIA) at the US Department of Commerce. At NTIA, she was responsible for the National Broadband Map, the largest open dataset of its kind, and $300M in grants to support the digital economy. Before this, she was a Global Leadership Fellow at the World Economic Forum in Geneva, Switzerland, and prior to this served as Assistant Secretary for Economic Development and Technology for the State of California. Anne served as a Senate Fellow and as an AmeriCorps*VISTA volunteer, founding a community technology training center in San Diego. Anne holds an MPA from the University of Southern California and a BA (Hons) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



Wilford (“Will”) Saunders (Keynote Moderator)
Open Data Guy, State of Washington Office of Privacy + Data Protection

Will Saunders leads the State of Washington's Open Data program in the Office of Privacy and Data Protection. He has worked on communications and technology issues for the state since 2005, including telephone regulation, broadband, economic development, central services management, data governance, and technology assessment. He is a co-author of Data Equity for Main Street, an open data curriculum for public libraries, and co-sponsor of a variety of civic technology projects including BCAT – the Broadband Community Assessment Toolkit. A graduate of Bowdoin College and the University of Maine School of Law, he is admitted to the bar in Washington and Maine, and serves on the board of OBee Credit Union.




Lilian Coral
Director/National Strategy + Technology Innovation, Knight Foundation

Lilian Coral joined Knight Foundation in September 2017. Coral is Knight's director of national strategy, where she manages the national portfolio and focuses on the development of the foundation’s Smart Cities strategy. She came to Knight from the City of Los Angeles, where she served as chief data officer for Mayor Eric Garcetti. In this role, she led the mayor's directive on Open Data beyond the lens of transparency and towards his vision of a data-driven Los Angeles through the management of the City’s Open Data program, the expansion of the use of data science and analytics, and the development of user-centered digital services. Coral led the development of the GeoHub, a first-of-its-kind data management solution for integrating geospatial information across the City of Los Angeles’ 41 departments, and oversaw the publishing of 1,100 city datasets and APIs, the management of five portals of operational and financial data, and the roll-out of 15+ digital services, applications and public facing dashboards. Prior to joining Mayor Garcetti, Coral spent 15 years working on a wide range of health and human services issues as an advocate and executive leader, having had the opportunity to work with labor unions, NGOs, foundations and human service agencies at all levels of government to transform the way government uses data and technology to serve its citizens. Coral has a bachelor’s degree in international studies from the University of California, Irvine and a master’s degree in public policy from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a native of Colombia, a place from where much of her inspiration for innovation and social justice emerged.




Rep. Derek Kilmer (WA)
U.S. Congressman (WA 6th District)

Derek Kilmer serves as the United States Representative of Washington’s 6th Congressional District. Born and raised in Port Angeles, and the son of two school teachers, Derek was taught to appreciate the value of education. As the dad of two little girls, he is working to make sure all children receive a quality education. Derek wanted to make a difference in his community, so he chose to study public policy, looking for ways to help economically struggling communities. He received a BA from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and earned a doctorate from the University of Oxford in England. Derek put his education into practice in Washington state, first as a business consultant for McKinsey + Company, where he helped businesses, non-profits, and government agencies run more efficiently. Derek served in the Washington state House from 2005 to 2007 and the state Senate from 2007 until he was elected to the US House in 2012. Derek was reelected to a third term in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2016 and chosen by his Democratic colleagues to serve on the House Appropriations Committee, one of only four ‘exclusive’ committees in the House. Derek serves on the Interior and Environment Subcommittee and Commerce, Justice, and Science Subcommittee. Derek has championed bipartisan efforts to better leverage federal research dollars to spur private sector innovation and job growth and bolster a 21st-century workforce. Derek has learned that addressing the challenges facing our nation will require an end to political brinkmanship and a focus on finding common sense, practical solutions. He's a member of organizations like the Bipartisan Working Group and the Problem Solvers Caucus, which work to bring Democrats and Republicans together to forge a greater consensus on a wide variety of issues. In his time in Congress, Derek has been recognized by a wide variety of groups for his effectiveness and advocacy. He’s been awarded the U.S. Navy’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the highest honor a civilian not employed by the Navy can receive from the Secretary of the Navy. Derek has also received a Silver Helmet award from AMVETS and a Friend of the National Parks award from the National Parks Conservation Association, been named a Hero of Main Street by the National Retail Federation, an Outstanding New Member by the Voices for National Service, and a Humane Champion by the Humane Society.



James Neal
Senior Program Officer, Office of Library Services, Institute of Museum and Library Services

James Neal is a Senior Program Officer in the Office of Library Services with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). He manages a portfolio of grants focused on building equitable digital communities, including open educational resources, digital inclusion, data privacy and security, and e-books. James is a graduate of the MLS program at the University of Maryland College of Information Science, Maryland's iSchool in the Information and Diverse Populations concentration. He worked for two years as a librarian with Prince George's County Memorial Library System. He maintains a strong interest in the future of public libraries. His background and experience consists of bookselling in several independent book stores, volunteer service in the Peace Corps in Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo); graduate education in anthropology; publicity, marketing, editorial, and sales roles in academic and scholarly publishing; public school teaching; experience in public relations, and project management and web design experience in user experience design.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (click to see full descriptions):

Air Quality Data through Community Engagement in Public Libraries
Catalina Escobar, Co-Founder | Ana Restrepo, Project Director

Data Counts! Using Data Literacy to Reach Hard-to-Count Communities
Jeff Lambert, Digital Literacy Coordinator

Data Toolbox: 25 Free Tools for the Data Librarian
Jim Craner, Library Technology Strategist, The Galecia Group

FAIR finds: Seeking and re-using open data
Adrienne Canino, Data & Science Outreach Librarian, University of Rochester River Campus Libraries

Libraries in Community Data Partnerships: The Civic Switchboard Project
Aaron Brenner, Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Creation | Nora Mattern, Scholarly Communications Librarian

Participatory Development of an Open Source Broadband Measurement Platform for Public Libraries
Chris Ritzo, Program Management and Community Lead at Measurement Lab, Measurement Lab, Simmons University | Dr. Colin Rhinesmith

Public Libraries as Leaders in the Open Data Movement
David Green, Library Systems Manager & Open Data Program Manager | Dave Pcolar | Luke Stroud

Research Data on the Digital Divide: A Public Library Case Study
Raymond Pun, Doctoral Candidate & Librarian, California State University (CDOEL) and Alder Graduate School of Education

The Presence of Library-Related Datasets on State and State Capital Open Government Data (OGD) Sites
Sandra Hirsh, School of Information; San Jose State University

Washington State: Harnessing the Power of Where. Open Data
Joanne Markert, Washington State GIS Coordinator, WATech, Office of the Chief Information Officer


MORE INFORMATION:
The School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.

Thursday, May 16, 2019

How to Handle Challenging Patrons - a Library 2.0 Webinar with Dr. Steve Albrecht

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"HOW TO HANDLE CHALLENGING PATRONS: PRACTICAL TOOLS FOR TOUGH SITUATIONS IN THE LIBRARY"

A 60-minute webinar, recorded in a special Library 2.0 series with Dr. Steve Albrecht, and held live on Tuesday, June 11th, 2019, at 4:00 pm Eastern Standard Time. 


Register to attend live or to have access to the recordings by clicking on the JOIN WEBINAR button to the top right of the event page here: https://www.library20.com/group/challenging-patrons
You will need to be logged into Library 2.0--if you are not yet a member, you can join for free here.

OVERVIEW
: Learn from one of the nation’s leading experts on library safety and security. Dr. Steve Albrecht has trained thousands of library employees on the do’s and don’ts of handling challenging, entitled, odd, or even threatening patrons, including the homeless, mentally ill, drug users, unruly students, gang members, thieves, Internet hogs, and others who can disrupt your library environment. This webinar program offers practical and realistic tools which will make your facility a better, safer place to work. Enjoy Steve’s real-life experiences as a law enforcement officer, mixed with his use of humor. Learn safe workplace behaviors, security measures, personal protection methods, and how to activate your “high-risk” customer service skills. Here’s what Steve covers in this fast and empowering webinar:
  • Your Tool Kit: Five Service Tools and Five Security Tools
    Our List of Challenging Patrons: From Pets to Pedophiles
  • Addressing Patron Harassment Problems: Setting Better Boundaries
  • Opiate Users and Narcan
  • Restroom Security Issues
  • Managing Homeless and Mentally Ill Patron Behavior Issues with Empathy
  • Enforcing Our Code of Conduct
  • Changing the Ratios of Confrontation
  • Using Space, Distance, and Proxemic Barriers
  • Workplace Violence and the Run-Hide-Fight Response to Active Shooters
  • Our Library Facility Security Plan
  • Interacting with the Police
  • Verbal Judo: The L.E.A.P.S. Model
  • Books for Your Resource List

AUDIENCE
: All library and school employees.

134216991?profile=original&width=100DR. STEVE ALBRECHT
Dr. Steve Albrecht has trained library audiences for 19 years. In 2015, the ALA published his book, Library Security. He holds a doctoral degree in Business Administration, an MA in Security Management, a BS in Psychology, and a BA in English. He is board certified in HR, security, coaching, and threat management. He worked for the San Diego Police Department for 15 years. He has written 21 books on business, security, and criminal justice subjects.

COST: $99/person - includes access to the recording and access to the attendee discussion forum. For group or other purchases, to submit a purchase order, or for any registration difficulties or questions, email steve@learningrevolution.com.

TO REGISTER: Click on the JOIN WEBINAR button to the top right of the event page: https://www.library20.com/group/challenging-patrons. You will first need to be a member of Library 2.0 (free) and be logged in. Please click "Sign Up" on the top right and we'll approve you quickly.

See you "online!"

Steve

Steve Hargadon
Library 2.0
SteveHargadon.com
@stevehargadon (Twitter)

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Keynote Panel Announced - Library 2.019 "Open Data" Mini-Conference - June 5th


We're excited to announce the keynote panel for our second Library 2.019 mini-conference: "Open Data," which will be held online (and for free) on Wednesday, June 5th, from 12:00 - 3:00 pm US-Pacific Daylight Time (click for your own time zone).

Local, state and federal governments are releasing data - the public's data - in new ways. Property maps, 311 data, school quality information and census statistics - all of these are examples of open data that give people the tools they need to learn and advocate for their causes. This web conference will explore how librarians are using open data, teaching others about it, and even creating it. You’ll learn about tools you can implement in your own library and hear stories from libraries that have partnered with their local and state governments. Armed with practical tools and experiences, you’ll be ready to start diving into open data to help your library and community!

This is a free event, being held live online and also recorded.
REGISTER HERE
to attend live and/or to receive the recording links afterward.
Please also join the Library 2.0 network to be kept updated on this and future events.

We invite all library professionals, employers, LIS students, and educators to participate in this event. The call for proposals is open now at https://www.library20.com/page/call-for-proposals. We will also need volunteer moderators for sessions rooms--if you've been through our training before (and even if you haven't!), email steve@learningrevolution.com if you might be able to help.

Participants are encouraged to use #library2019 and #libraryopendata on their social media posts leading up to and during the event.

KEYNOTE PANEL:



Anne Neville-Bonilla (Keynote Moderator)
Director, of the California Research Bureau, California State Library

Anne Neville-Bonilla is director of the California Research Bureau where she and her team develop non-partisan, independent research for the Governor and Legislature. As part of the California State Library’s Executive team, she is co-director a Knight Foundation grant to support open data literacy in public libraries and communities and serves on the board of CENIC, California’s research and education broadband network. Previously, she directed the State Broadband Initiative at the National Telecommunications & Information Administration (NTIA) at the US Department of Commerce. At NTIA, she was responsible for the National Broadband Map, the largest open dataset of its kind, and $300M in grants to support the digital economy. Before this, she was a Global Leadership Fellow at the World Economic Forum in Geneva, Switzerland, and prior to this served as Assistant Secretary for Economic Development and Technology for the State of California. Anne served as a Senate Fellow and as an AmeriCorps*VISTA volunteer, founding a community technology training center in San Diego. Anne holds an MPA from the University of Southern California and a BA (Hons) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.



Wilford (“Will”) Saunders (Keynote Moderator)
Open Data Guy, State of Washington Office of Privacy & Data Protection

Will Saunders leads the State of Washington's Open Data program in the Office of Privacy and Data Protection. He has worked on communications and technology issues for the state since 2005, including telephone regulation, broadband, economic development, central services management, data governance, and technology assessment. He is a co-author of Data Equity for Main Street, an open data curriculum for public libraries, and co-sponsor of a variety of civic technology projects including BCAT – the Broadband Community Assessment Toolkit. A graduate of Bowdoin College and the University of Maine School of Law, he is admitted to the bar in Washington and Maine, and serves on the board of OBee Credit Union.




Lilian Coral
Director/National Strategy + Technology Innovation, Knight Foundation

Lilian Coral joined Knight Foundation in September 2017. Coral is Knight's director of national strategy, where she manages the national portfolio and focuses on the development of the foundation’s Smart Cities strategy. She came to Knight from the City of Los Angeles, where she served as chief data officer for Mayor Eric Garcetti. In this role, she led the mayor's directive on Open Data beyond the lens of transparency and towards his vision of a data-driven Los Angeles through the management of the City’s Open Data program, the expansion of the use of data science and analytics, and the development of user-centered digital services. Coral led the development of the GeoHub, a first-of-its-kind data management solution for integrating geospatial information across the City of Los Angeles’ 41 departments, and oversaw the publishing of 1,100 city datasets and APIs, the management of five portals of operational and financial data, and the roll-out of 15+ digital services, applications and public facing dashboards. Prior to joining Mayor Garcetti, Coral spent 15 years working on a wide range of health and human services issues as an advocate and executive leader, having had the opportunity to work with labor unions, NGOs, foundations and human service agencies at all levels of government to transform the way government uses data and technology to serve its citizens. Coral has a bachelor’s degree in international studies from the University of California, Irvine and a master’s degree in public policy from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is a native of Colombia, a place from where much of her inspiration for innovation and social justice emerged.




Rep. Derek Kilmer (WA)
U.S. Congressman (WA 6th District)

Derek Kilmer serves as the United States Representative of Washington’s 6th Congressional District. Born and raised in Port Angeles, and the son of two school teachers, Derek was taught to appreciate the value of education. As the dad of two little girls, he is working to make sure all children receive a quality education. Derek wanted to make a difference in his community, so he chose to study public policy, looking for ways to help economically struggling communities. He received a BA from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and earned a doctorate from the University of Oxford in England. Derek put his education into practice in Washington state, first as a business consultant for McKinsey & Company, where he helped businesses, non-profits, and government agencies run more efficiently. Derek served in the Washington state House from 2005 to 2007 and the state Senate from 2007 until he was elected to the US House in 2012. Derek was reelected to a third term in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2016 and chosen by his Democratic colleagues to serve on the House Appropriations Committee, one of only four ‘exclusive’ committees in the House. Derek serves on the Interior and Environment Subcommittee and Commerce, Justice, and Science Subcommittee. Derek has championed bipartisan efforts to better leverage federal research dollars to spur private sector innovation and job growth and bolster a 21st-century workforce. Derek has learned that addressing the challenges facing our nation will require an end to political brinkmanship and a focus on finding common sense, practical solutions. He's a member of organizations like the Bipartisan Working Group and the Problem Solvers Caucus, which work to bring Democrats and Republicans together to forge a greater consensus on a wide variety of issues. In his time in Congress, Derek has been recognized by a wide variety of groups for his effectiveness and advocacy. He’s been awarded the U.S. Navy’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the highest honor a civilian not employed by the Navy can receive from the Secretary of the Navy. Derek has also received a Silver Helmet award from AMVETS and a Friend of the National Parks award from the National Parks Conservation Association, been named a Hero of Main Street by the National Retail Federation, an Outstanding New Member by the Voices for National Service, and a Humane Champion by the Humane Society.



James Neal
Senior Program Officer, Office of Library Services, Institute of Museum and Library Services

James Neal is a Senior Program Officer in the Office of Library Services with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). He manages a portfolio of grants focused on building equitable digital communities, including open educational resources, digital inclusion, data privacy and security, and e-books. James is a graduate of the MLS program at the University of Maryland College of Information Science, Maryland's iSchool in the Information and Diverse Populations concentration. He worked for two years as a librarian with Prince George's County Memorial Library System. He maintains a strong interest in the future of public libraries. His background and experience consists of bookselling in several independent book stores, volunteer service in the Peace Corps in Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo); graduate education in anthropology; publicity, marketing, editorial, and sales roles in academic and scholarly publishing; public school teaching; experience in public relations, and project management and web design experience in user experience design.

MORE INFORMATION:
The School of Information at San José State University is the founding conference sponsor. Please register as a member of the Library 2.0 network to be kept informed of future events. Recordings from previous years are available under the Archives tab at Library 2.0 and at the Library 2.0 YouTube channel.

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Global Education Conference 10th Anniversary - Member Support Drive - Can You Help?

To Our Dear Global Friends:
Ten years ago this November the two of us started the Global Education Conference, a fantastic, grass-roots virtual event that came out of our passions to help students, teachers, and organizations connect globally. We did something that was incredibly unique: we created a free online conference that let educators from around the world present to their peers at a convenient presentation time based on their local time zone; we let attendees see the schedule in their time zone calendar, and attend live sessions at no cost; we made the recordings available immediately after live presentations. That first year the conference ran for five days, 24 hours a day, with over 450 presentations and keynote sessions. It was a life-changing experience.
Over the past ten years, we have accumulated a combined audience of over 30,000 from 190+ countries, we’ve developed an open repository of recordings of every session presented, and we’ve maintained a global online community. Additionally, we have held other interactive online and physical events that have helped to elevate the profiles of many global education organizations.
During this time, some very thoughtful organizations have sponsored the Conference and our events, but that has never been enough funding to cover our labor and time-intensive work. As a non-profit organization, we have been committed to keeping the Conference authentic, open, and accessible with the hope that like-minded organizations would share our mission and value our work. The continuation of the Conference reached a crisis point last November when we had to cancel our flagship event because we could not raise the bare minimum to host the event.
After much deep reflection, we have decided to become a member-supported organization. Do not worry--this is voluntary support! We know that many of our members who are committed to global education face the same budget constraints that we do, so you do not have to contribute to stay a member of the conference network or attend our free events. However, for those that are in a position to help, we have created a structure for $10, $25, $50, $100, and $250 donations, with some fun ways of recognizing contributions. Please consider clicking HERE to see the member-contribution information page that also allows one to contribute immediately.
We have also set up a structure for very-reasonable non-profit or non-commercial “partner” commitments. If your organization is open to helping in this way, or you represent a commercial organization wanting to help, please email steve@learningrevolution.com.
Also, we are reconfiguring our next set of events including a series of day-long mini-conferences. Here is what is coming!
  • Global Education Day at #ISTE 19   - Philadelphia, PA - June 23, 2019
  • Global Project-Based Learning  Online Mini-Conference - August 1, 2019
  • Global Collaboration Week - Online - Week of September 23, 2019
  • GlobalEdCon Around the Clock Online Mini-Conference - November 19, 2019
  • Student Empowerment Online Mini-Conference -  February 13, 2020
We are so grateful for our global education community, and we want to find a way to have the next ten years be as exciting as the first ten have been. We hope you will consider helping us to do so!

Here's to a more globally-connected world!

Steve & Lucy

Steve Hargadonsteve@learningrevolution.comwww.stevehargadon.com

Lucy Graylucy@lucygrayconsulting.comwww..lucygrayconsulting.com